Primary & Secondary School Case Study

Below are graphs, charts, and narrative interpretations demonstrating the impact of the professional development series on Reading/English and Mathematics scores for all student groups on a low-performing public, primary and secondary school over a three-year period.

Primary School Study

Below are two charts representing the impact of the professional development series on Donyall Dickey’s Integrated Approach to Student Achievement on Reading/English and Mathematics scores for all student groups in a low-performing public, primary school after a 6 Full-Day Workshop Series. DGES demonstrated the most significant gains in the state of Nevada after the school had previously failed to meet adequate yearly progress for 4 consecutive years prior to working with Educational Epiphany.


 
 

Secondary School Study

Below are two bar graphs (and narrative interpretations) demonstrating the impact of the professional development series on Reading/English (ELA) and Mathematics standardized scores for all student groups on a low-performing public, secondary school over a four-year period.

Prior to the implementation of the Integrated Approach, as the chart above displays, a mere 9.4% or less than 1:10 students with special needs demonstrated an ability to do mathematics on grade level or above. Similarly, only 22% or 1:5 students with Limited English proficiency demonstrated competency in mathematics, while the aggregate passed at a rate of 65.2%. Also noteworthy is the 56.6% pass rate of the Hispanic population, the 48.3% pass rate of students from households living below the poverty line (FARMS). Four years later, not only does the aggregate pass the state mandated assessments at a rate of 90.2% proficient or advanced, but African Americans, Hispanics, students living below the poverty line (FARMS), Students with Special Needs (SPED), and English Language Learners (ELL) led the their non-minority, non-disabled, English proficient peers with 30% to 62.1% gains in mathematics proficiency since implementing Donyall Dickey’s proven instructional approaches.

Prior to the implementation of the Integrated Approach, the school depicted above was in School Improvement Status Year 3, and slated to be reconstituted by its state department of education. As the chart displays, a mere 25% or 1:4 students with special needs and limited English proficiency demonstrated competency in reading, while the aggregate passed at a rate of 75%. Similarly, only half of the Hispanic population and students from households living below the poverty line (FARMS) demonstrated adequate yearly progress. Four years later, not only does the aggregate read at a rate of 91.6% proficient or advanced, but also African Americans, Hispanics, students living below the poverty line (FARMS), Students with Special Needs (SPED), and English Language Learners (ELL) have demonstrated 30% to 53.7% gains since implementing Donyall Dickey’s instructional approaches.